Prison term for man who held up Shoalwater Pharmacy

Prison term for man who held up Shoalwater Pharmacy

A MAN who held up a Shoalwater Pharmacy with a replica handgun has been sent to prison for two year and 10 months.

Michael Kenward pleaded guilty to aggravated armed robbery at his sentencing at the Supreme Court on April 6.

The prosecutor said the robbery happened about 7pm, December 10, 2016 at the 777 Pharmacy at Shoalwater Shopping Centre.

Kenward and his co-accused were parked in the carpark of the centre before Kenward got out while the other person allegedly waited in the car.

Entering the pharmacy, Kenward was armed with a small black replica handgun as he approached two pharmacy employees.

The female manager was confronted by Kenward, who pointed the handgun directly at her while shouting demands for her to open the till.

 

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He continued to shout at her while she went to the till and took about $1700 from it, which she handed to Kenward.

He then fled the store and got in the car where his co-accused was allegedly waiting to drive him away.

The whole incident was captured on CCTV.

Clearly identified by the footage, Kenward was later arrested on December 12 at Warnbro Shopping Centre.

He made full admissions after being arrested by detectives that day.

Judge Joseph McGrath said the 29-year-old had co-operated by giving information relating to his offending.

A pre-sentence report said Kenward’s motivation for the offence was a drug debt that he had been threatened to pay.

“Whilst you expressed empathy towards the victims and remorse, the author of the pre-sentence report was of the view that you failed to recognise how your decisions have led to the current offending… that you had a lack of insight into your behaviour,” he said.

“The pre-sentence report also noted you have a history of substance abuse and negative associations.”

He accepted a letter from Kenward that shows he later accepted the trauma his actions had caused the victims.

“The drug debt is wholly a consequence of your decision to use drugs and, certainly, is not a factor in mitigation,” he said.

“The offence is serious. The offending was committed on vulnerable workers. The offending was premeditated. You arranged the co-accused as the driver.”

Judge McGrath said there were both personal and general deterrence taken into account for sentencing.

His sentence was backdated to December 12, 2016 to take into account time spent in custody and his is eligible for parole.