Red Frogs survive the cut

Red Frogger Ella Henry uses red frog lollies to help share party safe messages with youth during leavers.
Red Frogger Ella Henry uses red frog lollies to help share party safe messages with youth during leavers.

This week, news broke that Allen�s had stopped making spearmint leaves and green frogs due to flagging sales.

Production in Victoria ceased late last year and stocks in shops are now running dry.

Red frogs are safe though, because they sell 10 to 1 compared with green frogs.

Red Frogs WA general manager Hayden Glass said red frogs were a great ice-breaker to engage with young people from all walks of life and get them the help they need.

�We are very appreciative of their ongoing support and, while sad to see some Allen�s favourites discontinued, are very relieved that the humble red frog keeps his jersey � it would be very hard to be the Red Frog Crew with no Red Frogs,� Mr Glass said.

The initiative started 17 years ago when founder Andy Gourley purchased some lollies to help him connect with partying youth on schoolies over east.

Mr Glass recently visited Gilmore College to share a �Party Safe� message and prepare students for end of year celebrations.

�What an amazing group of young people with a great future ahead of them especially their very witty sense of humour,� he said.

�We have had a great relationship with lots of schools throughout WA including Gilmore College,�

Last year, Red Frogs talked to 42,000 students ahead of Leavers Week and distributed Mini-Mag booklets.

In fact, a spokeswoman for parent company Nestle said Allen�s would up its sponsorship with Red Frogs this year from 16 tonnes of the raspberry-flavoured jellied amphibians to 20 tonnes nationally.

In WA alone, one tonne of red frogs are given to young people as a conversation starter between Red Frog chaplains and youth.

n SWEET DEAL:

GOING: Spearmint leaves, Green frogs.