Bushland lost after LandCorp wins appeal to build three residential lots at Montario Quarter

TRG Properties and Primewest’s proposal for housing, cafés and retail in the Montario Quarter in Shenton Park.
TRG Properties and Primewest’s proposal for housing, cafés and retail in the Montario Quarter in Shenton Park.

LANDCORP will build on all three residential lots at Montario Quarter in Shenton Park after successfully appealing against a decision by the Statutory Planning Commission (SPC) to only develop two of the blocks.

Late last month, the WA Planning Commission (WAPC) decided to allow LandCorp to develop all three residential blocks instead of saving about 75 per cent of Lemnos Street bushland and its linkage at the Woodland Precinct, which was initially approved by the SPC.

Bush Not Bricks co-ordinator Heidi Hardisty, who has spent four and a half years trying to save the bushland, said she was devastated with the decision and “cynically not surprised”.

“The WAPC members overturned the earlier decision of their own specialist SPC which would have saved most of the bushland and over three quarters of the linkage,” she said.

“It’s been over four and a half years trying to save this bushland.”

LandCorp Metropolitan and Industrial general manager John Hackett said they requested the WAPC to reconsider the decision as it contradicted the previously approved plans and would impact the development of the remaining residential block.

“It would of potentially increased the bushfire hazard for vulnerable residents surrounding the estate and was not in line with the Commonwealth Environmental Assessment,” he said.

Mrs Hardisty said the development would have a long lasting and significant negative effect on existing wildlife and the environment.

“If you take at least half of the bushland, put a building in the middle of it as well as roads, you’re creating fragmentation and reducing the significance of that quarter,” she said.

“It’s disheartening and demoralising and it’s been such a long trek – we want our bushland and city safe.”

Mr Hackett said the western bushland area was assessed by an environmental expert throughout planning of the development.

“An expert environmental consultant found areas of significantly degraded vegetation, as well as a disused car park and access road,” he said.

“The development sites have been positioned over these areas, in order to minimise the impact on existing, higher quality vegetation.”