Community leaders wear orange for 16 Days in WA to Stop Violence Against Women campaign

Government and community leaders wore orange to launch the 16 Days in WA to Stop Violence Against Women campaign. Picture: Greg Lewis
Government and community leaders wore orange to launch the 16 Days in WA to Stop Violence Against Women campaign. Picture: Greg Lewis

ORANGE may not be everyone’s colour of choice but government and community leaders wore it in support of the State Government’s 16 Days in WA to Stop Violence Against Women campaign that started last weekend.

The aim of the campaign that ends on December 10 (Human Rights Day) is to raise awareness and educate West Australians on what they can do or say to make a positive difference.

As part of the campaign, 17 landmarks across WA will be lit in orange – the international colour for the campaign.

Prevention of Family and Domestic Violence Minister Simone McGurk said violence against anyone was unacceptable but it was a shocking fact that most women who are murdered are killed by someone they knew, and most women who experienced violence did so at the hands of a current or former partner.

“Government alone cannot solve this complex issue, everyone needs to play their part – government, business, community services and individuals,” Ms McGurk said.

“We all have a role to play in changing the conversation that allows violence against women to go unchallenged.

“It can be as simple as calling out aggressive or demeaning behaviour; understanding where to go to get support for someone experiencing violence; or starting a conversation about respect with the young people in your life.

“Together we can stop violence against women.”

Visit https://www.communities.wa.gov.au/about/projects-and-programs/16-days-in-wa.

The Statistics

  1. Every week in Australia, at least one woman is killed by a current or former partner.
  2. WA has the second highest rate of reported physical and sexual violence perpetrated against women.
  3. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are nearly 11 times more likely to die due to assault than non-indigenous women.
  4. The number of sexual harassment complaints received by WA’s Equal Opportunity Commission doubled in the past year.
  5. The total annual cost of violence against women and their children in WA was estimated to be $2.8 billion in 2015-16.