Cottesloe ocean pool advocates to carry on with their ideas

Trevor Saleeba is perplexed by the council’s attitude to his ocean pool proposal south of Cottesloe Groyne. Picture: Jon Bassett.
Trevor Saleeba is perplexed by the council’s attitude to his ocean pool proposal south of Cottesloe Groyne. Picture: Jon Bassett.

NORTH Cottesloe ocean pool proponent Chris Shellabear will carry on after councillors left a feasibility study into an alternative site apparently in limbo.

In November, councillors had no alterative motion to consider after they rejected a councillor’s proposal to scrap a $72,000 second stage of the study, which followed about 1200 public submissions backing a beach facility several years ago.

“I think that what the council has proved is that they have chosen projects with greater obstacles, but we will continue to engage with the members of the community that support it, and Water Polo WA,” Mr Shellabear said.

Mr Shellabear said he would develop the constitution for a managing association of his pool, which had an undisclosed patron, south of Barchetta Cafe this summer.

“My opinion is the council not pay for the first part of the consultant’s study because it came up with an option that had two main problems, Aboriginal heritage at Mudurup Rocks and the environmental hurdle of using the fringing reef,” he said.

However site proponent and architect Trevor Saleeba said his design avoided the rocks and used the groyne, but its opponents at the council had used Aboriginal heritage as a “ploy to try and kill it”, when all he wanted was councillors to facilitate the idea’s exploration.

“I am particularly perplexed by the council administration and all the council, as I offered the administration a proposal in advance, just to proof it up, and they wouldn’t look at it,” he said.

He said the State Government considered his pool an “interesting idea” to promote tourism, and talks would continue.

Cottesloe resident Tom Locke has seen five Cottesloe mayors in 18 years proposing a pool north of the groyne, and he said an alternative shark barrier the council is investigating would collect storm seaweed when great white sharks migrated in winter and spring.

Asked for any pool’s status, a council spokeswoman said it would have to be reconsidered before any statement.