Council ‘no’ to request for beehive in Shenton Park

In her public statement, Shenton Park resident Janet Rakich said she opposed the application.

“As a resident located about 300m from the applicant and a registered nurse, I object to keeping a beehive so close to a children’s playground,” Ms Rakich said.

“Many children are allergic to bees, and they become aggressive when they do not get enough access to pollen and water.”

Cr Julie Matheson said she would take the applicant on their word that they were experienced in beekeeping.

“If this applicant is not managing their bees, their licence can simply be taken away,” Cr Matheson said.

“Why would we be the council for ‘no’ on this matter? Our beautiful parks and gardens come from bee pollination. If rejected, the applicant could then go to the State Administrative Tribunal.

“Why would we put them through that cost?”

Beekeeper of 20 years Tiffane Bates said she kept up to 30 beehives at the Crawley University of WA campus.

“Urban beekeeping is of great value to our community and the future of our environment,” she said.

Hensman Road resident Kylie Fraser said she had a very negative experience of a neighbour keeping bees near her home.

“I was stung three times within eight weeks, and my four-year-old was stung twice in three weeks,” she said.

“We stopped having barbecues, using our pool, even not wearing shoes outside.

“I am afraid this would set a precedent of more hives in the area.”

Cr Lee Hemsley said he was initially sympathetic to the applicant. But the concerns made by local residents were very reasonable.

“Making a complaint if there is a problem could be a bureaucratic nightmare,” she said.

“Given there doesn’t seem to be any strong guidelines on how to enforce good beekeeping behaviour, the easiest thing to say is no.”