Cyclists see danger in the path of a cocaktoo sanctuary in Cottesloe

Over-55s Cycling Club safety and advisory officer Bruce Robinson has questioned how planting more trees for cockatoo could affect the safety of the long-awaited PSP cycling path through Cottesloe. Picture: Andrew Ritchie.
Over-55s Cycling Club safety and advisory officer Bruce Robinson has questioned how planting more trees for cockatoo could affect the safety of the long-awaited PSP cycling path through Cottesloe. Picture: Andrew Ritchie.

CYCLISTS will want eco-tourists to get out of the way if a green corridor for endangered Carnaby’s cockatoos and the visitors is planted along the principle shared path (PSP) for bikes in Cottesloe.

“The idea of people looking transfixed at a flower when there’s someone coming up behind then at 30km/h on a bike is a problem,” Over-55s Cycling Club safety and advisory officer Bruce Robinson told Cottesloe Residents and Ratepayers Association members recently.

Swanbourne resident and corridor proponent Anielka Briggs told the members there could be corridor of trees and bushes for the cockatoos beside the $18.6 million PSP, which the State Government will build from Swanbourne to Mosman Park by mid-2020.

However, Mr Robinson said while cyclist would like to work with the corridor’s proponents, the PSP was a “cycling highway” for uninterrupted cycling, any tourists looking at flora and fauna nodes could be hazards to riders, and branches could drop on the path which could be lifted by roots if trees were not at least 5m to 10m from the route.

The proposal to provide more Carnaby’s habitat along the Fremantle railway corridor emerged from controversy when it was revealed about 48 trees and bushes would be removed for the PSP through Cottesloe in July.

Ms Briggs said the corridor would increase Cottesloe’s low tree canopy coverage, allow people to see the flora and fauna of the area, provide food and shelter for the birds, which already fed in the railway reserve, and be a tourist attraction.

She said locally hired bikes could allow tourists to view the nodes of plants, and “pop-up forests” of other species in large pots could show city dwellers the flora of the regions, but residents had to lobby the council to include the planting in its planning.

At last Tuesday’s meeting, Cottesloe councillors supported the Carnaby’s corridor in principle, and offered to assist is progression, including getting Perth Transit Authority approvals.