Floreat man’s passion shows no signs of flagging

Floreat man’s passion shows no signs of flagging

WHEN it comes to flags, money is no object for Floreat resident David Price, who estimates he has spent more than $2,500 on his obsession. Mr Price has been flying his growing collection of flags, which is now at 240, out the front of his Newry Street home for more than a decade.

“Every year I said to my wife I wanted a flagpole, but she never believed me,” he said.

“Then on my 50th birthday I got a flagpole, and we had an erection party.”

The vexillologist, a person who studies flags, said he changed the flags daily, depending on events that had occurred in history.

If there was no reason to fly a flag, he just flies one of his many Australian ones.

“I keep a spreadsheet and look on Wikipedia for what happens on a particular day,” he said.

“I have flags from most countries around the world, all the Australian states, some US states, as well as celebration and organisation flags.

A professional speaker by trade, Mr Price purchases his flags from eBay, ranging in price from $8 to $600.

“My most expensive flag is a 4m long, 2m high hand-embroidered American flag,” he said.

“But my favourite flag is my giant Australian flag, which is 4.5m long and too heavy for me to fly on the pole.”

The flags not only brighten up the street, but also serve other purposes.

“I have neighbours who look at the flags to see which way the wind is blowing before they go surfing,” he said.

“And the lady next door looks out her window to see if the sea breeze has come in.”

It also draws many admirers.

“I know people that take a detour off Cambridge Street just to see which flag is up,” he said.

“I also get Christmas cards saying ‘thank you’ for your flags.”

Mr Price has a Facebook page, Today’s Flag, which he updates daily.

“I have people following around the world,” he said.

“I think the flags just add something to people’s lives; they make it colourful.”