Foyer Oxford, Leederville highlight for outgoing Anglicare WA CEO Ian Carter

Ian Carter (Anglicare) stepping down as CEO after 24 years. Picture: Andrew Ritchie www.communitypix.com.au   d489150
Ian Carter (Anglicare) stepping down as CEO after 24 years. Picture: Andrew Ritchie www.communitypix.com.au d489150

OUTGOING Anglicare WA chief executive Ian Carter says the success of Foyer Oxford in Leederville is one of his proudest achievements over the past 24 years.

Mr Carter, who will leave the organisation early next year, said nearly 400 homeless youth had come through the centre with 93 per cent moving on to independent housing and 86 per cent still engaged in education, training or employment since leaving.

He said 25 per cent of residents at Foyer Oxford had come from State care.

Anglicare WA is among many organisations that support the national Home Stretch campaign, which is urging state governments to change legislation to support young people in State care until they are 21 rather than 18.

“Home Stretch was so obvious to us because we were already working with the young people and we know that exit care is a good thing,” Mr Carter said.

“The wrap around support is what families naturally have but when you are homeless you live in isolation and have often lived a traumatic existence and don’t have those support structures.

“But at Foyer Oxford you become part of the community here and have your case managers, youth workers as well as each other.”

Children in State care are largely left to fend for themselves once they turn 18, making them our most vulnerable young people.
Community News is supporting Home Stretch, a national campaign urging all state governments to change legislation to support them until they are 21.
Here’s how YOU can help:
1. Join the Home Stretch campaign at: thehomestretch.org.au
2. Sign up to be a foster carer at: dcp.wa.gov.au

When Mr Carter was appointed chief executive in 1995, Anglicare WA was still a traditional welfare agency.

“We kept doing the same thing every year like handing out Christmas hampers at Christmas,” he said.

“When I started we turned over $2.5 million a year, now we turn over $45 million a year and have 1000 staff and volunteers.”

Mr Carter is putting his next move out to the universe.

“I’ve done four careers over my lifetime and want to be up with the millennials who traditionally have five careers,” he said.