Harley Lacy and Bill Marmion discuss ‘historic changes’ to WA outback


Nedlands MLA Bill Marmion and Shenton Park scientist Harley Lacy with the Partnership for the Outback photobook.
Nedlands MLA Bill Marmion and Shenton Park scientist Harley Lacy with the Partnership for the Outback photobook.

SHENTON Park scientist Harley Lacy met with Nedlands MLA Bill Marmion last month to discuss “historic changes” proposed for 90 per cent of West Australian outback.

The former pastoralist, who left Polelle Station near Meekatharra in 1989, said he had “firsthand” experience of the damage wrought by tough economic times and past grazing practices.

“The reality is that livestock is often no longer viable or sustainable in some parts of our state today,” Mr Lacy said.

“As a consequence many people have struggled.

“For decades, WA’s laws have meant that anyone on a pastoral lease had to run stock, whether it suited them or not. The Barnett government is now looking at changing these laws to allow people to diversify into new enterprises more appropriate to a modern economy.

“It’s an exciting proposal which offers the possibility of greater long term viability, the potential for greater profitability and more sustainable management for some of WA’s most iconic landscapes.”

During their meeting, Mr Lacy presented Mr Marmion with a coffee-table book featuring outback photographs.

The book was produced by non-profit group Partnership for the Outback, featured the names of 10,000 West Australians in support of the outback, including hundreds from Mr Marmion’s Nedlands electorate.

The State Government is currently inviting public comment on the proposed changes.

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