Perth Freight Link will bisect East Fremantle, affecting homeowners��

Protester Damien Flynn.Picture: Jon Bassett
Protester Damien Flynn.Picture: Jon Bassett

FORMER Swanbourne resident Damien Flynn lost his parents⿿ family home to the West Coast Highway-Servetus Street bypass in the 1990s and now faces having the proposed $1.6 billion Perth Freight Link (PFL) through his new suburb of East Fremantle.

“I was just thinking how my parents tried to fight and survive the Servetus Street project before the house we grew up in and they built in 1956 was demolished and became the bridge over the Servetus Street cutting that bisects Swanbourne,” Mr Flynn (69) said. “This freight link will bisect East Fremantle.”

Mr Flynn joined about 1000 protesters against the 13km PFL, comprising a truck toll clearway from the Roe 8 section through Bibra Lake wetlands to East Fremantle and Fremantle Port, at Stirling Bridge last Sunday.

“They’re going to tear up Bibra Lake and it’s a family area where we walk our two-year-old son around the lake each week, and even if the EPA (Environmental Protection Authority) agrees to it, there’ll be trash everywhere,” South Lake truck driver and undecided voter David Jensen said.

Perth MHR Alannah MacTiernan said the PFL, which the Federal Government claims has a cash benefit ratio (CBR) of $2.8 for every dollar spent, would “not bring home the economic bacon”. She committed $2 million from any future Labor government to plan a route to a new Kwinana port with a claimed CBR of about $8.7 per dollar spent.

Fremantle MHR Melissa Parke, who represents part of Cottesloe MLA Colin Barnett’s electorate in North Fremantle, said she would stand in front of bulldozers at Roe 8 if activists failed in their bid for a judicial review of the route’s environmental approval handed to the Supreme Court last Friday.

Earlier this year, Main Roads WA told North Fremantle the PFL across Stirling Bridge could comprise two downstream lanes.

Yesterday, Transport Minister Dean Nalder said Roe 8’s route was decided but there were no decisions on the PFL’s route to the port.

“I am aware of the Supreme Court action, that will go through its due process, but I’m very comfortable that this project has followed due process and that it is a responsible project, and look forward to making it happen,” he said.