North Cottesloe Surf Lifesaving Club’s centenary a swell celebration

Jolimont resident Vern Lloyd brought her grandchildren Charlotte (5) and Jordan (3) Hick to build sandcastles.
North Cottesloe Primary School student Alasdair Marsden (9) got to grip with a snake provided by Ranger Red.
It was a giggle when (l-r) George and Lou met Willow Williamson in the surfski shed.
Kneeboarders celebrated after the surf craft fleet went past.
Surf boats were among the fleet.
All chipped in to bring the surf boats off the beach.
Jolimont resident Vern Lloyd brought her grandchildren Charlotte (5) and Jordan (3) Hick to build sandcastles. North Cottesloe Primary School student Alasdair Marsden (9) got to grip with a snake provided by Ranger Red. It was a giggle when (l-r) George and Lou met Willow Williamson in the surfski shed. Kneeboarders celebrated after the surf craft fleet went past. Surf boats were among the fleet. All chipped in to bring the surf boats off the beach.

SAND, surf and even a snake were all part of 100th birthday celebrations for North Cottesloe Surf Lifesaving Club on Saturday.

The club began with 17 women in the 35 breakaway members of rival Cottesloe SLSC, founding North Cottesloe SLSC in 1918.

The club became the first surf club in Australia to have women in its ranks at its first clubhouse on nearby Grant Street.

There are now more than 2000 members, and the club’s rowers and other beach sports men and women often lead WA’s entries in national competitions.

“I remember flying in one Christmas Eve to find myself waking up on Christmas Day alone, so I went to the beach for a run and found the club has put on a great Christmas breakfast and I found a place because it’s one big family,” Curtin MHR and club member Julie Bishop said.

Club president Ian Clarke said the club was setting itself up for the next 100 years by concentrating on its young members, and others yet to join, and providing them with a variety of roles and paths within the State-wide community of beach patrollers.

“Working with them, and working with Surf Lifesaving WA, we’ve got a more structured program for the nippers aged seven to 13 that allows them to develop their skills and training into the different area of surf lifesaving, including surf sports, education, training and administration,” Mr Clarke said.

He said surf lifesaving skills were often called upon away from the beach, whether attending a nearby road crash or the school-aged members helping the elderly collapsed in the street.

Families and current members were the centre of the centenary celebrations, which included a sand castle competition, a fleet of surf skis, surf boats and inflatable rescue boats.

There was also a wildlife exhibit including a snake and a dingo, with about 800 people standing in the sand to creating of a large “100”.