Perth supports Muscular Dystrophy Australia’s National Superhero Week

People will be dressed up as their favourite masked crusader for National Superhero Week in September to raise money for Muscular Dystrophy Australia. Pic: mycause.com.au.
People will be dressed up as their favourite masked crusader for National Superhero Week in September to raise money for Muscular Dystrophy Australia. Pic: mycause.com.au.

MASKED crusaders and cape-wearing heroes will be out this September for a good cause.

People across Australia will dress in lycra and wear their underwear on top of their clothes as part of National Superhero Week from September 3-9.

Money raised will go to Muscular Dystrophy Australia (MDA) to help fight the condition that affects one in 625 Australians.

Statistics show that 82 per cent of children with MD aged 14 years and younger were boys, something MDA founder and executive director Boris Struk is well aware of.

Mr Struk established the organisation about 35 years ago after being told haunting words about the fate of his son Ryan who was diagnosed with duchenne muscular dystrophy.

“Go home and enjoy your son because he will be dead by the time he is 15 years old,” the father remembered.

These words and the lack of information and support available prompted Mr Struk to make sure no other parents would have to endure what he and his wife Ineke went through.

Muscular dystrophy is a term used for more than 60 neuromuscular disorders and it is defined as a progressive muscle destroying disorder, which wastes all muscles away causing immobility, respiratory problems and cardiac complications.

In his personal blog on the MDA website, Mr Struk said muscular dystrophies were 60 distinct incurable disorders affecting men, women and children.

He said MD was complex with a “plethora” of conditions and diagnoses in the community, which needed to be understood through education and support.

Mr Struk said most schools had heard of the condition but did not have the expertise on how to best deal with a child with the condition.

“Children with MD will have different needs throughout their lives,” he said.

“Each child is different.

“The one thing all children with MD have in common is that they will never achieve independence.”

Kindergartens, schools, community groups and workplaces around Perth are encouraged to get involved in the Superhero Week and help raise funds for MD care and research.

To donate, visit mycause.com.au/events/nationalsuperheroweek.