Residents see red over traffic signage changes

Doubleview residents Marina Bowler with her dog Bonnie, Celeste Hill with Campbell (5 months), Kelly Bull, Anja Madzarac with Milli (2) and cyclist Vicki Wakefield at the Moorland and Herbert streets intersection. Photo: David Baylis
Doubleview residents Marina Bowler with her dog Bonnie, Celeste Hill with Campbell (5 months), Kelly Bull, Anja Madzarac with Milli (2) and cyclist Vicki Wakefield at the Moorland and Herbert streets intersection. Photo: David Baylis

CHANGES made to a Doubleview road aimed at improving bike safety could end up having the opposite effect, a resident warns.

Kelly Bull has lived on Herbert Street for six years and was caught off-guard several weeks ago when she found priority access at the Moorland Street intersection had changed as part of the City of Stirling and Department of Transport’s Moorland Street Bicycle Boulevard connecting Stirling to Scarborough Beach.

Road users travelling along Moorland previously faced a stop sign as they approached Herbert but these have been removed and drivers on Herbert are now required to give way.

The changes occurred at neighbouring intersections without warning and Ms Bull witnessed drivers continuing through the give way signs.

Line markings were also removed and added in a piecemeal approach, adding to the confusion, prompting her to describe the situation as a “balls up”.

“It’s very confusing. My suggestion would have been to have major signage in place first,” she said.

“I think a bicyclist is going to get hurt.”

Other residents shared her concern in a community Facebook group and said they had been seeking remedy from City of Stirling and Main Roads since May.

“I mean what do they want – someone to die first?” Ms Bull said.

Changes at the Moorland and Herbert streets intersection. Photo: David Baylis

Anja Madzarac said she was driving with her baby daughter in the back seat recently when a car “came flying down” Moorland not slowing through the give way sign.

“Luckily I stopped last second,” she said.

“If I was going a little bit faster, I don’t even want to think what could happen.”

Resident Celeste Hill witnessed cars running stop signs and said she and her neighbours had “multiple near misses with vehicles at these intersections”.

The day after Community News contacted the City about the issue, staff were on site installing signage to warn of changed traffic conditions.

But Ms Bull said nearby streets still had temporary and conflicting signage.

City acting chief executive Michael Littleton said they also removed conflicting road markings and trimmed trees to ensure the give way signs were visible.

“It is designed to provide a safe riding environment for all levels of experience by prioritising the movement of bicycles and separating cyclists from cars in some sections,” he said.

“Additionally, the City will be erecting Main Roads WA approved advance warning signage on all approaches and these will be in place for three months while drivers transition to the new road environment.”

Changes at the Moorland and Herbert streets intersection. Photo: David Baylis

Main Roads controls approval, installation and maintenance of permanent signs but spokesman Dean Roberts said the City was responsible for temporary traffic management.

“Main Roads received complaints around the changes to Moorland Street and the temporary signage,” he said.

“These concerns were raised with the City, which advised they would rectify the situation.”

Innaloo residents last year had the same concerns when traffic conditions were altered on Morris Road and intersecting Ambrose and Stoner streets to accommodate the bike boulevard, and the City installed temporary signage following questions from Community News.

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