Revelations from first week of Claremont serial killings trial

Plenty of revelations have emerged in the first week of the long-awaited Claremont serial killings trial in Perth.
Plenty of revelations have emerged in the first week of the long-awaited Claremont serial killings trial in Perth.

THE first week of Western Australia’s so-called “trial of the century” is drawing to a close and plenty of revelations have already emerged.

Bradley Robert Edwards’ second wife gave explosive but truncated testimony on Thursday, saying she feared for her life towards the end of their marriage when she compiled a notebook of his bank transactions because she was sick of his lies.

At least one bank statement that the notes were based on was missing and covered the period when the third victim, 27-year-old lawyer Ciara Glennon, was murdered on March 15, 1997.

The notes also showed two withdrawals from a Bayview Terrace ATM, despite Edwards claiming to police he had no association with Claremont.

The woman was prevented from elaborating.

Bradley Edwards.

On Wednesday, the confessed rapist’s first wife painted a picture of a dutiful husband who would drop her off and pick her up from work every day, and was civil after they broke up amid her infidelity.

But he once failed to collect her after an “incident” at Hollywood Hospital, she said.

That was an attack on social worker while he was doing work for Telstra at the facility in 1990, which earnt him an assault conviction and an order to complete a sex offender program.

On Tuesday, Edwards’ barrister Paul Yovich said in his brief opening remarks the defence case was simple: his client did not do it.

He said some DNA exhibits relied upon by prosecutors had been contaminated in a laboratory and fibre evidence may also be tainted.

On Monday, prosecutor Carmel Barbagallo said it was a miracle the bodies of Ms Glennon and childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, were found in bushland.

While the body of 18-year-old secretary Sarah Spiers has not been found, the killer’s identity would be proved in other ways, she said.

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