Support rolls in for wheel clamping ban

Clamping continues.
Business owners Wayne Bowen and Stuart Wright pictured in 2017 with a wheel clamping warning sign. Picture: Andrew Ritchie www.communitypix.com.au   d475593
Clamping continues. Business owners Wayne Bowen and Stuart Wright pictured in 2017 with a wheel clamping warning sign. Picture: Andrew Ritchie www.communitypix.com.au d475593

STIRLING ratepayers are throwing their support behind a push to ban wheel clamping.

Hundreds of people have signed a petition to ban the practice in the City just a few days after it was created by Scarborough business owner Wayne Bowen.

It follows Stirling mayor Mark Irwin’s motion introduced at the August 13 council meeting which will see the City investigate drafting a local law banning its use.

Mr Bowen said wheel clamping was a “terrible blight on community and business”.

“It is predatory behaviour designed to simply make money for the wheel clampers, rather than discourage incorrect parking,” he said.

“There are many other ways to deal with people who may be ‘taking advantage’ of free private parking.

“Current wheel clamping procedures, in the vast majority of cases, are penalising the wrong people and it is negatively impacting local community and business.”

Mr Bowen’s Surf Boardroom on Scarborough Beach Road is one of these businesses impacted and he first contacted Community News with his concerns in 2017.

He and The Yoga Garage owner Stuart Wright had numerous customers clamped by a contractor operating at the carpark near the service station on West Coast Highway, with drivers charged $170 to have their car released.

At the time, strata managing agent Realmark Leederville said the contractor had been running there for about three years.

Nearly 400 people have signed the petition, which offers support for Cr Irwin’s motion and seeks delivery of the petition to the State Government and WA Local Government Association.

The petition is open here until September 20.

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