Water centre to test sea pool

‘In six weeks we’ll settle on a preliminary design the centre can run through it’s computer model,’ pool proponent Tom Locke said, after he and other supporters of the project met centre director Jorg Imberger last week

The centre will use wave height, wind and tide data from its buoy about 500m south of the groyne to run a real-time model to determine the pool’s final design on the north side of the 1960s-built groyne that created the current wide beach.

Professor Imberger said the model could run when proponents confirmed the pool’s width, which is currently proposed at about 30m, and whether the pool’s wall would comprise only rocks or would also have a boardwalk.

It would also have to be decided how much swell and wave action could pass through underwater gaps in the wall because child swimming classes, lap swimmers and the disabled would use the facility.

‘But if it’s going to be a 50-year design then the wall would need to go quite a way into the beach because if there’s going to be a 20cm sea level rise in 50 years there’s going to be no beach left,’ Prof Imberger said.

Honours student Luan Nguyen will put data from the buoy, and others placed offshore from Perth, through his computer model to indicate the designs’ impact on beach erosion and surf patterns, before a completed design is finalised.

This is expected around June next year.

‘The goal is to create a design that is low maintenance, can be used by the disabled, continues to function as a groyne and has a look that is acceptable to the community,’ Mr Nguyen said.

Former UWA professor of sports science exercise John Bloomfield said the pool would make Cottesloe Beach highly attractive for disabled swimmers and young families.