Cottesloe in the ’60s not that desirable says long-time resident

Cottesloe in the ’60s not that desirable says long-time resident

WHEN Betty McGeever and her late husband moved to Cottesloe in 1968, it was not the desirable area it is now.

“South Cottesloe was considered the pits at the time,” Mrs McGeever said.

“I still remember a friend saying to me ‘Oh, what a pity you couldn’t afford to have bought in Nedlands’.”

Things have changed over time.

“When I first moved into the street, there were workers cottages everywhere,” Mrs McGeever said.

“Now I am surrounded by million dollar property,”

She worked in Fremantle at the time she bought the home, so its location near the train station was a benefit.

“We had only one car and my husband worked in the city, so one of us took the train to work,” she said.

“Even now, I like that everything is within a short distance – dentists, doctors, shops, and the train.”

Mrs McGeever said another benefit of living in Cottesloe was the climate.

“The climate is really good, particularly the sea breeze, which during a heatwave doesn’t seem to get over Claremont hill,” she said.

“When my husband and I used to drive back from the city we would note the cool air as we came over the hill by the fire station. The air is clearer and I like that I am by the ocean and although I swim only about six times a year, I like to walk along the beach and always drive by the ocean when I go out.

“Also we are not far from the river; I kayak and being by both the river and ocean is fabulous.”

The local community and council also made Cottesloe an attractive place to live.

“The community is very engaged and we have a good council,” Mrs McGeever said.

“Being small, we have excellent representation.

“Our councillors are easily accessible and responsive.” n