Western suburbs lead the way in Australian Institute of Architects WA awards

Cottesloe Residence by Scanlan Architects.
Burt Street by Keen Architecture in Fremantle.
Grey Street by Local Architecture in Fremantle.
Aria Luxury Apartments by Hillam Architects in Swanbourne.
Dalkeith on Waratah by MJA Studio.
The Pocket by Cameron Chisholm Nicol in Claremont.
Banham Architects' house in North Beach.
Banham Architects' house in North Beach.
Cottesloe Residence by Scanlan Architects. Burt Street by Keen Architecture in Fremantle. Grey Street by Local Architecture in Fremantle. Aria Luxury Apartments by Hillam Architects in Swanbourne. Dalkeith on Waratah by MJA Studio. The Pocket by Cameron Chisholm Nicol in Claremont. Banham Architects' house in North Beach. Banham Architects' house in North Beach.

EIGHTEEN homes in the western suburbs are up for a prize at this Friday’s Australian Institute of Architects WA Architecture Awards, which will be announced at a presentation evening at Crown Towers.

Entries include submissions from Nash & Ghersinich Architects, Spaceagency, Klopper & Davis Architects, Chindarsi Architects and Cameron Chisholm Nicol.

Among them, Keen Architecture competes in the residential alterations and additions category with its Burt Street project in Fremantle, which features a striking curved glass sliding door.

The renovation and extension reorients the living spaces into the backyard to make as much use of the northern aspect as possible, while creating a free-flowing relationship between indoor and outdoor spaces.

Also in Fremantle is Local Architecture’s Grey Street project, which will go head to head with the other entries in the small project architecture category.

The residence is architect Natalie Miller’s own home and is a modest family abode that is focused on functionality, quality of space and construction.

The home takes cues from the ongoing history of brick construction in the port city and aspires to make a contemporary contribution to the tradition.

The Aria Luxury Apartments in Swanbourne, which have been entered into the interior architecture category, has become a centrepiece of the residential redevelopment in the coastal suburb.

Designed by Hillam Architects and built by ProBuild, the resort-themed apartment complex features a diverse range of materials, including golden anodised aluminium screens, and has a clever U-shaped form that maximises the panoramic views of the surrounding coast.

This year’s entries also include several city-based projects that have come to fruition as a result of the decision to sink the railway and reconnect the city with the river.

“Projects including Elizabeth Quay, the Perth Busport and Kings Square will see Perth become a more engaging and functional city,” AIA WA president Suzanna Hunt said.

“Bringing the river to the city and connecting the CBD with Northbridge for the first time in over a century will open up many new business and tourism opportunities.

“The best cities in the world all have engaging public spaces and it is pleasing to see these developing in Perth.”

Awards are given in 13 categories with the highest overall honour, the George Temple Poole Award, presented to the project judged most worthy overall.

The public is invited to view the exhibition of entries on weekdays until June 30, 9am-5pm, at Allendale Square in Perth.

North Beach stunner also in running 

On a North Beach block with enviable views of the Indian Ocean, Banham Architects has designed a decidedly modern beach house for its retired owners.

The coastal family residence is an entry in this year’s Australian Institute of Architects WA Architecture Awards in the residential house and interiors categories. It is also vying for the Colorbond Award for Steel Architecture.

The brief from the clients was simple – to create a home that was open, relaxed and embraced the views of the ocean.

“To a large extent they left it up to us,” Banham Architects director Steeg (OK) Banham said.

“The clients were downsizing and they lived next door for close to 40 years, and had originally engaged us to redesign the house on that block.

“But then this block came up for sale and they decided it was much easier to build brand-new than to have to move and then move again.”

The owners had worked with Banham Architects before and liked the clean, modern style the design firm were known for.

“They wanted a house that was going to be elegant, stylish and did not date, while also being maintenance-free,” Mr Banham said.

“They’ve got 15 grandkids so even though it is actually quite a modest house because there’s only the two of them living there, it had to be designed to entertain a large family.”

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